Ink On The Side - The Difference Between Mother’s Day and Fa

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Before I start I better just tell you all I’m English so Grey all the way!

My interest in the grey/gray issue was sparked yesterday when I was trying to trick my auntie by telling her to write down "Grey Daze". Her attempts went as follows:
Grade A's
Gray Days
Gray Daze

I'd always considered my auntie to be very good with the English language and therefore presumed I'd been spelling Grey wrong my whole life and kept quiet. Today however I began writing a song for my band called "Grey Day" and decided to Google it to check which was correct...leading me here. After reading every single post on this page (sad but hey I'm bored) I've picked out a couple of quotes I'd like to comment on:

1. "Yeah, because you Brits don't have a lot of differences among your dialects, or anything"
Ever talked to a Scouser (person from Liverpool)? It's like a different language.

2. "America freed itself from British rule A LONG TIME AGO, GET OVER IT!!!"
Fair enough but you are still using our language though and as far as I’m aware you do call it English.

In my opinion there’s nothing wrong with making words up, apparently Shakespeare made up over 3000 words with about 1200 of them being used in the English language today. So if you do feel like making words up, don't confuse people and call it American. Just out of interest is your dictionary called the English dictionary or the American English dictionary?

I think a website should be set up (if there already isn't one) that lists all the differences between the two languages so people can check it when a Grey/Gray issue arises. I believe that a lot of the differences between American and English are down to Americans making mistakes and when these mistakes are repeated over and over it eventually becomes part of the language. An example is this sentence is acceptable in America:
"I already walked the dog."
Where did the "have" go in that sentence... a "'ve" doesn't even have to be used.

But hey most of our media comes from the USA so Britain is undoubtedly going to start speaking American soon anyway. Sorry for the long rant :P

Chris.

My husband spends a ton of time at the playground with our kids and swears he can tell the difference between moms ..

Fighting For My Daughter: An Essay From Tamika Fuller

For me, the conflict between motherhood and my life as a writer is not so much Brooks’ fear that art’s job is to unsettle, while a mother’s job is to make safe. I unsettle and disturb my children all the time. I remain unconcerned that my safe, middle-class life as a stay at home mom makes me less edgy or interesting. I view my own interestingness as being directly related to the thoughts I think and the work I do rather than the aesthetics of my leisure time. After all, Wallace Stevens was an executive at an insurance company. The idea that parenting is any more boring than working at an insurance agency is absurd.

Feb 09, 2014 · Sometimes I wonder if the biggest difference between the tiger mom and the helicopter ..

Hello.

Speaking as someone with both a B.A. and an M.A. in English (with an emphasis in language and literature, i.e., semantics, semiotics, linguistics, rhetoric, etc.), the difference as had been explained to me both by former instructors (of disparate nationalities, such as Canadian, Serbian, French, Mexican) and my mother (Lithuanian), is this:

Gray is a color.
Grey is the act of turning grey.

Gray is an adjective, which describes a noun (a gray crayon).
Grey is a verb, which describes an action. (Her hair is greying as a result of the stress in trying to determine the difference between the spellings of "gray" and "grey".)

The easiest way to remember the difference is that gray is a color, thus it signifies a permanent state of being, and grey [to grey] signifies a transitional state, so since A comes before E in the English alphabet, grAY stays put and doesn't change color, but grEy moves along down the alphabet, and indicates the act of turning gray.

Hope that tip helps!

The difference between mother-daughter and father-daughter bonds. SM: How is a daughter's relationship with her father different than her bond with her mother?


The difference between a preface, foreword ..

Before I start I better just tell you all I’m English so Grey all the way!

My interest in the grey/gray issue was sparked yesterday when I was trying to trick my auntie by telling her to write down "Grey Daze". Her attempts went as follows:
Grade A's
Gray Days
Gray Daze

I'd always considered my auntie to be very good with the English language and therefore presumed I'd been spelling Grey wrong my whole life and kept quiet. Today however I began writing a song for my band called "Grey Day" and decided to Google it to check which was correct...leading me here. After reading every single post on this page (sad but hey I'm bored) I've picked out a couple of quotes I'd like to comment on:

1. "Yeah, because you Brits don't have a lot of differences among your dialects, or anything"
Ever talked to a Scouser (person from Liverpool)? It's like a different language.

2. "America freed itself from British rule A LONG TIME AGO, GET OVER IT!!!"
Fair enough but you are still using our language though and as far as I’m aware you do call it English.

In my opinion there’s nothing wrong with making words up, apparently Shakespeare made up over 3000 words with about 1200 of them being used in the English language today. So if you do feel like making words up, don't confuse people and call it American. Just out of interest is your dictionary called the English dictionary or the American English dictionary?

I think a website should be set up (if there already isn't one) that lists all the differences between the two languages so people can check it when a Grey/Gray issue arises. I believe that a lot of the differences between American and English are down to Americans making mistakes and when these mistakes are repeated over and over it eventually becomes part of the language. An example is this sentence is acceptable in America:
"I already walked the dog."
Where did the "have" go in that sentence... a "'ve" doesn't even have to be used.

But hey most of our media comes from the USA so Britain is undoubtedly going to start speaking American soon anyway. Sorry for the long rant :P

Chris.