~William Butler YeatsI don't know how you feel about old age...

~Leo RosenbergThe tragedy of old age is not that one is old, but that one is young.

Marcus Tullius Cicero, Ethical Writings II (On Old Age) [-44]

~Benjamin Franklin,



When forty winters shall beseige thy brow,
And dig deep trenches in thy beauty's field,
Thy youth's proud livery, so gazed on now,
Will be a tatter'd weed, of small worth held:
Then being ask'd where all thy beauty lies,
Where all the treasure of thy lusty days,
To say, within thine own deep-sunken eyes,
Were an all-eating shame and thriftless praise.
How much more praise deserved thy beauty's use,
If thou couldst answer 'This fair child of mine
Shall sum my count and make my old excuse,'
Proving his beauty by succession thine!
This were to be new made when thou art old,
And see thy blood warm when thou feel'st it cold.
~William Shakespeare


What most persons consider as virtue, after the age of forty is simply a loss of energy.

~Mignon McLaughlin, , 1960Nothing is more enjoyable than a leisured old age.

Treatises on Friendship and Old Age, by Marcus Tullius Cicero

Latin, Aristo, or Ariston, of Chios, was a Stoic philosopher, and an immediate disciple of Zeno. Some authorities read and there was an Ariston, a Peripatetic philosopher, of Ceos, of whose many writings only a few fragments have been preserved. The two are often confounded, even by ancient writers, and either of them may have written the treatise or dialogue on old age here referred to.

~Cicero/HolmesThe 50s Forty is the old age of youth; fifty the youth of old age.

Agreeable rather than hateful; for as wise old men are charmed with well-disposed youth, so do young men delight in the counsels of the old, by which they are led to the cultivation of the virtues. I do not feel that I am less agreeable to you than you are to me. — To return to our subject, you see that old age is not listless and inert, but is even laborious, with work and plans of work always in hand, generally, indeed, with employments corresponding to the pursuits of earlier life. But what shall we say of those who even make new acquisitions? Thus we see Solon, in one of his poems, boasting that, as he grows old, he widens the range of his knowledge every day. I have done the like, having learned Greek in my old age, and have taken hold of the study so eagerly — as if to quench a long thirst — that I have already become familiar with the topics from Greek authors which I have been using, as I have talked with you, by way of illustration. When I read that Socrates in his old age learned to play on the lyre, I could have wished to do the same, had the old custom been still rife; but I certainly have worked hard on my Greek.

Erikson,


Ethical Writings II (On Old Age) - Online Library of Liberty

~Lin Yutang, "Human Life a Poem," , 1937


No one can say that a life with childhood, manhood and old age is not a beautiful arrangement; the day has its morning, noon and sunset, and the year has its seasons, and it is good that it is so.

Cicero's essay on old age. - ResearchGate

“Honorable age is not that which standeth in length of time, or that is measured by number of years. But wisdom is the gray hair unto men, and an unspotted life is old age. . . . . He, being made perfect in a short time, fulfilled a long time.” — iv. 8, 9, 14.

On Dec 1, 1971 S Jarcho published: Cicero's essay on old age.

Naevius was the earliest Roman poet of enduring reputation. He wrote both comedies and tragedies, and in his old age, banished to Utica for libels contained in his plays, he produced an epic poem on the first Punic war, in which he had served as a soldier.

Find On Old Age Cicero and Informative Content. Search Now!

~Seigneur de Saint-Evremond, 1696


When the straight, eager forms that we knew in youth
Become bent with age, we rebel at the truth
That never, again, will they be young and strong;
For old age—so ruthless!—has now come along.
~Gertrude Tooley Buckingham, "We Do Not Grow Old" (1940s)


Do I forget how to be glad, how to feel the sun and the grasses, how to romp with the winds and laugh with the trees?...

Cicero essay old age - Passion Fire Media

~Victor Hugo


[M]any appear to best advantage in old age, when their character assumes a gentler tone, as becomes men who have seen the world and take life easily.