Gay Marriage and Religion - Essay - Stenly

Free College Essay Gay Marriage and Religion

Gay marriage and religion essay

White evangelical Protestants, a notably conservative group, have doubled their support for same-sex marriage—12 percent in 2003 to 28 percent in 2014—although there is still minority support within the group. Additionally, more black Protestants now support same-sex marriage than they did one decade ago—23 percent in 2003 to 38 percent in 2014.

The generation gap in support for same-sex marriage is striking and persists even among conservative political and religious groups.

I Support Gay Marriage And Religious Freedom Laws

„„Political divisions on the issue of same-sex marriage have widened over time. The gap in support for same-sex marriage between Democrats and Republicans has increased from 21 percentage points in 2003 to 30 points today. In 2003, roughly 4-in-10 Democrats (39%) and political independents (39%) favored same-sex marriage, compared to 18% of Republicans. Currently, nearly two-thirds (64%) of Democrats and nearly 6-in-10 (57%) independents support same-sex marriage, compared to only 34% of Republicans. More than 6-in-10 (62%) Republicans oppose same-sex marriage.

06/04/2015 · I Support Gay Marriage And Religious Freedom Laws

Younger Americans are generally more likely to say certain personal behaviors are morally acceptable than older Americans, with the important exception of abortion. Half of Millennials say that sex between two adults of the same gender is morally acceptable, compared to only 26% of seniors. Nearly 7-in-10 (68%) Millennials say that sex between an unmarried man and woman is morally acceptable, compared to 38% of seniors. However, similar numbers of Millennials (33%) and seniors (28%) say that having an abortion is morally acceptable. Nearly 6-in-10 (59%) of both Millennials and seniors say having an abortion is morally wrong.

Free College Essay Same Sex Marriage Religion


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In 2003, all major religious groups opposed same-sex marriage, with the exception of the religiously unaffiliated. Today, there are major religious groups on both sides of the issue. Religiously unaffiliated Americans (73%), white mainline Protestants (62%), white Catholics (58%), and Hispanic Catholics (56%) all favor allowing gay and lesbian couples to marry. A majority (83%) of Jewish Americans also favor legalizing same-sex marriage. Hispanic Protestants are divided; 46% favor allowing gay and lesbian couples to legally marry and 49% oppose. By contrast, nearly 7-in-10 (69%) white evangelical Protestants and nearly 6-in-10 (59%) black Protestants oppose same-sex marriage. Only 27% of white evangelical Protestants and 35% of black Protestants support same-sex marriage.

Gay Marriage and Religion - Essay

The strongest supporters of same-sex marriage continue to be members of non-Christian religious traditions and religiously unaffiliated Americans. At least three-quarters of Buddhists (85%), the religiously unaffiliated (78%), and Jewish Americans (76%) favor allowing gay and lesbian to marry. Solid majorities of Hindus (66%), Orthodox Christians (61%), white mainline Protestants (59%), white Catholics (59%), and Hispanic Catholics (56%) also express support for same-sex marriage. In contrast, majorities of black Protestants (54%), Hispanic Protestants (59%), Mormons (66%), white evangelical Protestants (67%), and Jehovah’s Witnesses (72%) oppose allowing gay and lesbian couples to marry. Muslims are divided in their opinions over same-sex marriage (41% favor, 45% oppose).

Gay Marriage in the U.S. | Teen Opinion Essay | Teen Ink

Women are somewhat more likely to support same-sex marriage than men, a pattern that is consistent across generations. Overall, nearly six in ten (57%) women, compared to only half (50%) of men, favor allowing gay and lesbian couples to marry legally. Among young adults, roughly three-quarters (74%) of women and two-thirds (67%) of men favor same-sex marriage.1 The age gap is roughly the same size among seniors. More than four in ten (43%) senior women, but only 36% of senior men, support same-sex marriage.

Gay marriage and religion essay - PV Plus

„„Today, nearly 7-in-10 (69%) Millennials (ages 18 to 33) favor same-sex marriage, compared to 37% of Americans who are part of the Silent Generation (ages 68 and older). The generation gap today, or the difference in support for same-sex marriage between America’s youngest and oldest cohorts, is now 32 points, roughly as wide as it was in 2003.