The most important questions about Shakespeare's Romeo and Juliet.

Romeo and Juliet - WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE

Script of Act I Romeo and Juliet The play by William Shakespeare

Verona is home to two feuding noble houses, the Montagues and the Capulets. In response to the constant brawling between members of these families, the Prince of Verona has issued an edict that will impose a death sentence on anyone caught dueling. Against this backdrop, young Romeo of the house of Montague has recently been infatuated with Rosaline, a niece of Capulet. Rosaline is quickly forgotten, however, when Romeo and his friends disguise themselves and slip into a masque ball at Capulet's house. During the festivities, Romeo catches his first glimpse of Juliet, Capulet's daughter. In one of Shakespeare's most memorable scenes, Romeo steals into the garden and professes his love to Juliet, who stands above on her balcony. The two young lovers, with the aid of Friar Laurence, make plans to be married in secret.

These characters always think they are helping, but they end up leading Romeo and Juliet to their deaths....

Shakespeare Resource Center - Romeo and Juliet …

The Capulets, meanwhile, press for Juliet to marry Paris, a cousin to the Prince. Juliet, relying again on Friar Laurence, devises a desperate plan to avoid her parent's wishes. She obtains a drug that will make her seem dead for forty-two hours; while she is in this state, Friar Laurence will send word to Romeo of the situation so that he can rescue her from her tomb. Unfortunately, fate will not be so kind; the letter from Friar Laurence is delayed. Romeo instead hears second-hand news that Juliet has died. Grief-stricken, Romeo purchases poison and hastens to Juliet's tomb to die at her side. Meanwhile, Friar Laurence has discovered to his horror that his letter did not arrive, and he means to take Juliet away until he can set things aright.

In Romeo and Juliet the typical gender roles that men and women were supposed to play had an influence on the fate of their lives....

You could say that Romeo and Juliet had just too much bad luck and the play leaves you thinking "if only " If only the messenger had delivered the letter, if only Juliet had woken up sooner there are so many unfortunate chances in the play....

No Fear Shakespeare: Romeo and Juliet: Act 3, Scene 3